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20130801
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Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the website wikileaks, is under legal and personal attack from the u.s. government for publishing military and diplomatic secrets. when we met him, he was under house arrest in the english countryside, where we conducted the most extensive television interview he's given about his life, his beliefs, and his concern about being charged and extradited to the united states. >> it is completely outrageous. it is the worst form of censorship we have seen by the united states since the 1950s, since the mccarthy era. >> are you surprised? >> i am surprised, actually. >> but you are screwing with the forces of nature. [ticking] >> [blows whistle] >> you might not think of sugar, corn, or metal as material that can cause a catastrophic explosion in a factory. but when they're ground into dust and suspended in the air, all it takes is a small spark to set off a disaster. >> if this material were gasoline, there would be no doubt in any owner's or operator's mind what needed to be done. >> that would be an emergency. >> absolutely. >> is dust functionally the same thing? >> it has the same power. >>
to pay. absolutely. [ticking] >> billions of dollars is coming from this office to help bail out the u.s. economy. why is it so unique? because it is in beijing, headquarters of the china investment corporation. how much do you have to invest? >> we have $200 billion. >> $200 billion? >> $200 billion. >> this is the fund's president, gao xiqing. he has poured billions into investment houses on wall street, causing some concern here in the u.s. >> "we think, based on your historical behavior, china, that you're gonna do mischief in our economy." [ticking] >> hey, how you doing? >> oh, i'm doing well. how are you doing, sir? >> how you doing, scott? >> good to see you. >> is davos the most important meeting on earth? >> well, the top of the alps is a long way to come for the rich and powerful, but you'll run into billionaire george soros; eric schmidt, the guy who runs google; nobel prize winners; captains of industry; kings; and even a queen. >> lot of the work is done just sitting in the cafeteria in the congress hall and just seeing people pass by and discussing things. >> the queen han
, think about it like this. people--if they can use a product of any category--photos, music, tv, anything--either by themselves or with their friends... >> mm-hmm. >> i think most of the time, people want to do those things with their friends, so-- >> so is the answer "yes"? [ticking] you describe bill gates in very harsh terms. um, you've described him as being quite abusive. i mean, it's not a pretty picture. >> and i felt like when i wrote it, i should just tell it like it happened, in an unvarnished way, warts and all. >> you'll hear how the two high school buddies who started microsoft and a computer revolution had some pretty trying times along the way. do you think he came to think that you weren't working as hard as he was and it became a source of resentment with him? >> well, i think he was always pushing people to work as hard as they possibly could. >> you included. >> um, maybe me more than everybody else. >> you talk about his yelling--screaming. >> uh, there was a lot of yelling. >> you guys never understood! you never understood the first thing about this. i mean, there's
. >> naturally i have a lot of top secret stuff, but we got to keep that between us. >> you always do. >> so you're all business. i think of you as mr. indoors. >> you've got it. >> i got it. so here you have this son. >> i know. >> he's a farmer. he's outdoors. he's down in the dirt. are you sure he's your son? >> well, i think that's worth checking out. you'll have a big exclusive. >> well, he is really different. explain that. >> well, he likes not only farming. he likes machinery too. i mean, i think he likes doing big things, you know, moving dirt. he just is happiest when he's working hard. i'm happiest when i'm just kind of sitting around watching football. >> howard's different in another way. he's an active, hands-on philanthropist who visits up to 20 countries a year. the howard g. buffett foundation focuses on world hunger, spending $50 million a year on projects like feeding programs in ethiopia and agriculture education in afghanistan. and he records it all through the lens of his own camera. >> you all of a sudden begin to kind of look around, and you notice there's a lot of people
's watching this is asking himself or herself. why are you giving us an interview right after you've been indicted? it's pretty unusual. >> so my lawyer tells me. [ chuckles ] >> well, he's approving of this, isn't he? >> he is. i have a story to tell. i'm innocent. i need people to understand what happened, and i'm glad to have this chance to do it. >> her story involves the investigation into who from the board was leaking confidential information to the press about corporate strategy, hp's interest in buying another tech company, even deliberations over who they would hire as c.e.o. >> the idea that the most sensitive discussions of the board would end up on the front page of the wall street journal was destructive. it destroyed the trust between people, and if they don't trust each other, they can't function as a board. >> a majority of the board asked dunn to initiate a leak inquiry, which soon ran amuck... [ camera shutters clicking ] ...and has made her the public face of one of corporate america's biggest scandals. >> we're here on a troubled day. >> great disappointment here. >>
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)